Ebola Patient Ian Crozier and Physicians to Speak About Unexpected, Vision-Threatening Consequences for Ebola Virus Survivors

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Ian Crozier, an infectious disease specialist, signed on with the World Health Organization and arrived in Kenema, Sierra Leone to help in the fight against the Ebola outbreak in August 2014. Within a few weeks, he himself contracted the disease and was evacuated to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta in critical condition. Crozier and physicians will share their perspective at ARVO 2015 closing session.

UTHealth Researchers Use 'Knockout Humans' to Connect Genes to Disease Risk

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Newswise imageResearchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday.

Novel Approach Blocks Amyloid Production in Alzheimer's Mouse Model

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Offering a potential early intervention for Alzheimer's disease (AD), researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Cenna Biosciences, Inc. have identified compounds that block the production of beta amyloid peptides in mice.

Combined Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Shows Promise for Advanced Prostate Cancers

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Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that blocking or removing immune-suppressing cells allows a special type of chemotherapy -- and the immune cells it activates -- to destroy prostate tumors. This novel combination therapy, termed chemoimmunotherapy, achieved near complete remission in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer. The study is published April 29 in Nature.

5-Year Survivors of Esophageal Cancer Still Face Low But Constant Risks

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According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015 about 17,000 new cases of esophageal cancer will be diagnosed, and about 15,600 people will die from the disease. While the 5-year survival rate in the 1960s and 1970s was only about 5%, improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and management have led to improved survival. However, information is lacking about what happens to long-term survivors of esophageal cancer. A presentation at the AATS Annual Meeting shows that while five-year survival is up to 39%, these patients still face many health risks and should be monitored for 10 years or more.

Why Do Obese Men Get Bariatric Surgery Far Less Than Women?

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Newswise imageA new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors that contribute to a major gender disparity among U.S. men and women undergoing weight loss surgeries. Men undergo the surgeries in far lower numbers than women.

Leapfrog Gives UChicago Medicine 7th Straight 'A' for Hospital Safety

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The University of Chicago Medicine was named one of the safest hospitals in the country for the seventh consecutive time by the prestigious and independent Leapfrog Group. UChicago Medicine is one of only 182 U.S. hospitals, out of about 5,000, to receive an A in each survey.

Study Shows Babies Born with Drug Withdrawal Symptoms on the Rise

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The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the U.S. with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology.

Pancreatic Cancer Risk Linked to Weak Sunlight

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Newswise imageWriting in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude.

Fruitfly Sperm Cells Reveal Intricate Coordination in Stem Cell Replication

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Newswise imageStem cells are key for the continual renewal of tissues in our bodies. As such, manipulating stem cells also holds much promise for biomedicine if their regenerative capacity can be harnessed. Researchers are making headway in this area by studying stem cells in their natural environment in fruitflies.

Loyola Appoints New Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon

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Sonya Agnew, MD, has joined Loyola University Health System as a plastic and reconstructive surgeon. Dr. Agnew is an assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and the Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. She sees patients at the Loyola Center for Health at Burr Ridge and the Loyola Outpatient Center in Maywood.