Ebola Patient Ian Crozier and Physicians to Speak About Unexpected, Vision-Threatening Consequences for Ebola Virus Survivors

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Ian Crozier, an infectious disease specialist, signed on with the World Health Organization and arrived in Kenema, Sierra Leone to help in the fight against the Ebola outbreak in August 2014. Within a few weeks, he himself contracted the disease and was evacuated to Emory University Hospital in Atlanta in critical condition. Crozier and physicians will share their perspective at ARVO 2015 closing session.

UTHealth Researchers Use 'Knockout Humans' to Connect Genes to Disease Risk

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Newswise imageResearchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) are helping to make precision medicine a reality by sequencing entire exomes of people to assess chronic disease risk and drug efficacy. The results of a study on this topic were published in Nature Genetics on Monday.

Novel Approach Blocks Amyloid Production in Alzheimer's Mouse Model

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Offering a potential early intervention for Alzheimer's disease (AD), researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Cenna Biosciences, Inc. have identified compounds that block the production of beta amyloid peptides in mice.

Combined Chemotherapy and Immunotherapy Shows Promise for Advanced Prostate Cancers

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Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that blocking or removing immune-suppressing cells allows a special type of chemotherapy -- and the immune cells it activates -- to destroy prostate tumors. This novel combination therapy, termed chemoimmunotherapy, achieved near complete remission in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer. The study is published April 29 in Nature.

5-Year Survivors of Esophageal Cancer Still Face Low But Constant Risks

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According to the American Cancer Society, in 2015 about 17,000 new cases of esophageal cancer will be diagnosed, and about 15,600 people will die from the disease. While the 5-year survival rate in the 1960s and 1970s was only about 5%, improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and management have led to improved survival. However, information is lacking about what happens to long-term survivors of esophageal cancer. A presentation at the AATS Annual Meeting shows that while five-year survival is up to 39%, these patients still face many health risks and should be monitored for 10 years or more.

Why Do Obese Men Get Bariatric Surgery Far Less Than Women?

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Newswise imageA new study by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine has identified demographic, socioeconomic and cultural factors that contribute to a major gender disparity among U.S. men and women undergoing weight loss surgeries. Men undergo the surgeries in far lower numbers than women.

Leapfrog Gives UChicago Medicine 7th Straight 'A' for Hospital Safety

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The University of Chicago Medicine was named one of the safest hospitals in the country for the seventh consecutive time by the prestigious and independent Leapfrog Group. UChicago Medicine is one of only 182 U.S. hospitals, out of about 5,000, to receive an A in each survey.

Study Shows Babies Born with Drug Withdrawal Symptoms on the Rise

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The number of infants born in the United States with drug withdrawal symptoms, also known as neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), nearly doubled in a four-year period. By 2012, one infant was born every 25 minutes in the U.S. with the syndrome, accounting for $1.5 billion in annual health care charges, according to a new Vanderbilt study published in the Journal of Perinatology.

Pancreatic Cancer Risk Linked to Weak Sunlight

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Newswise imageWriting in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude.

Genetic Landscape Can Impact Treatment for Children with Rare, Aggressive Cancer

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Newswise imageFor children with rare, aggressive and advanced cancer, precision medicine may help doctors determine their best treatment options, a new study finds. Using information from a patient's entire genome helped suggest personalized treatment options for nearly half of children with cancer, and led to specific treatment changes in a quarter of these patients.

Autism Care Network to Expand

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Dr. Kristin Sohl, a pediatrician at the University of Missouri Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders, will expand the growing ECHO Autism program, which launched in March, to an additional 10 sites. Sohl's ECHO Autism project will be the centerpiece of a recent grant renewal through the federal Health Services Research Administration's Autism Intervention for Physical Health initiative. The $15 million award is shared among 14 autism centers in North America.

UC San Diego Scientists Investigate Global Hemorrhagic Fever Bacterial Disease

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Newswise imageAn international research team, headed by Joseph Vinetz, MD, professor of medicine at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and director of the UC San Diego Center for Tropical Medicine and Travelers Health, has been awarded a 5-year, $1.89 million cooperative agreement to carry out translational research studies of leptospirosis, an infectious and sometimes fatal bacterial disease endemic in much of the world.

September is National Sickle Cell Awareness Month

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September is National Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) Awareness Month, and Mount Sinai Health System is reminding the community of the importance of newborn screening performed soon after birth with a blood test, education for families with this inherited condition and comprehensive care for children and adults including regular visits with a specialist can reduce complications of this illness.

September is Thyroid Cancer Awareness Month

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According to the American Cancer Society, 62,000 Americans will be diagnosed with thyroid cancer in 2015, most of them before reaching age 55. Experts at the Head and Neck Institute at Mount Sinai Health System encourage the public to perform regular thyroid neck self-exams and be aware of the symptoms of thyroid cancer.

Study Shows K17 Protein Promotes Cancer

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Newswise imageKeratin 17 (K17), a protein previously believed to provide only mechanical support for cancer cells, appears to play a crucial role in degrading a key tumor suppressor protein in cancer cells named p27. This finding, published in the September 1 issue of Cancer Research, is based on the work of researchers in the Department of Pathology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. They found that K17 has the ability to enter the nucleus of cancer cells, leading to the degradation of p27. The work illustrates for the first time that a keratin can function to promote the development of cancer. Furthermore, the paper details that tumors with high levels of K17 are biologically more aggressive and have a worse prognosis than low K17 tumors.

NOWDiagnostics Inc. Acquires Canada's ZBx Corporation

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NOWDiagnostics Inc., based in Springdale, Ark., recently completed its acquisition of ZBx Corporation of Canada, a move that brings the company closer to its vision of a world where people have greater access to information concerning their health.

Expert Available: Cutting-Edge Molecular Diagnostic Tests Provide Benefit for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

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Newswise imageAutism spectrum disorders (ASD) are not completely understood neurodevelopmental disorders diagnosed solely on the basis of behavioral assessments of social, communicative and repetitive symptoms. Though behaviorally distinctive and reliably identified by experienced clinicians, ASD is clinically and genetically extremely diverse, affecting each patient differently. Efforts to identify subsets of patients with similar outcomes and chances of recurrence has been difficult, said Judith Miles, M.D., P.h.D., a University of Missouri child health physician and researcher specializing in medical genetics, in an invited editorial published Sept.1 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

$7 Million Grant Aids Efforts to Eliminate Neglected Tropical Diseases

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Newswise imageResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have received a $7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation aimed at eliminating river blindness and elephantiasis, two neglected tropical diseases that annually sicken millions.

Corrected Protein Structure Reveals Drug Targets for Cancer, Neurodegenerative Diseases

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Newswise imageProtein Kinase C is a family of enzymes that controls the activity of other proteins in a cell by attaching chemical tags. That simple act helps determine cell survival or death. When it goes awry, a number of diseases may result. In a study, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reveal a more accurate structure of PKC, providing new targets for fine-tuning the enzyme's activity as needed to improve human health.

Police More Likely to Be Killed on Duty in States with High Gun Ownership

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Newswise imageAcross all 50 states and the District of Columbia, homicides of police officers are linked to the statewide level of gun ownership, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Public Health. The study found that police officers serving in states with high private gun ownership are more than three times more likely to be killed on the job than those on the job in states with the lowest gun ownership.

Vitamin D in Teens: Don't Overdo It, Bad Things Might Happen

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Dosing obese teens with vitamin D shows no benefits for their heart health or diabetes risk, and could have the unintended consequences of increasing cholesterol and fat-storing triglycerides. These are the latest findings in a series of Mayo Clinic studies in childhood obesity.